Robert F. Kennedy speech ~ Mindless Menace of Violence

Robert F. Kennedy speech ~ Mindless Menace of Violence

This poignant and inspirational speech by Robert F. Kennedy forcefully condemns the evil of violence and highlights the need for peace.  It is a very appropriate speech to listen to on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, which  of course “is not the day for politics”.  The speech echoes the message of all faiths of the world.

The best way to honour the victims of 9/11 is to recognize that the life an American and an Israeli citizen is as precious as the life of an Iraqi or a Palestinian. Our sense of humanity should override any other bonds.

Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1968 after winning the California primary election for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.

The soundtrack is from the movie “Bobby”.

September 10, 2011 10:26 pm 0 comments

The Myth of the Clash of Civilization – Part 1

The Myth of the Clash of Civilization – Part 1

Source: Wikipedia

The Clash of Civilizations is a theory, proposed by political scientist Samuel P. Huntington, that people’s cultural and religious identities will be the primary source of conflict in the post-Cold War world.

This theory was originally formulated in a 1992 lecture at the American Enterprise Institute, which was then developed in a 1993 Foreign Affairs article titled “The Clash of Civilizations?”, in response to Francis Fukuyama’s 1992 book, The End of History and the Last Man. Huntington later expanded his thesis in a 1996 book The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order.

 

The phrase itself was first used by Bernard Lewis in an article in the September 1990 issue of The Atlantic Monthly titled “The Roots of Muslim Rage”.

This expression derives from clash of cultures, already used during the colonial period and the Belle Époque.

September 10, 2011 8:33 pm 0 comments

An Islamic History of Europe

An Islamic History of Europe
September 2, 2011 5:25 am 0 comments

Paradise Found: Islamic Architecture and Arts

Paradise Found: Islamic Architecture and Arts
September 2, 2011 5:23 am 0 comments

Empire of Faith: Prophet Muhammad and rise of Islam (PBS Documentary)

Empire of Faith: Prophet Muhammad and rise of Islam (PBS Documentary)

The Making of Islam: Empire of Faith
by Robert Gardner, Producer

The production of Islam: Empire of Faith was a big challenge from the beginning, simply because it covered more than a thousand years of history and culture, and a very large part of the world.

But we really wanted to push beyond the conventional form of historical documentaries, which have depended on pans and tilts of still pictures, supplemented with landscapes and interviews. We wanted to find a way to use the visual techniques usually reserved for fiction motion pictures to tell a story of great scope that took place in pre-photographic history. This meant the project would require very large scale costumed re-enactments and equipment far beyond the ordinary documentary production package of camera, zoom lens, tripod and small light-kit.

We knew that we had to find a way to present images of cultural history — both re-enacted scenes and contemporary scenes of Islamic architecture and city life — in a way that would evoke the past, but maintain a sense of authenticity. The scenes would be dream-like and impressionistic but would still give viewers a sense that what they were seeing was accurate in historical terms.

We designed a production package that included a robotic crane with an 18-foot reach (Jimmi-jib), allowing us to fly the camera through architectural spaces, and a Steadicam that would allow for smooth camera moves through buildings at ground level — even mounting it on a truck to shoot running horses at full speed. We took a wide selection of lenses from extremely wide to telephoto and we also brought a high-speed camera for true slow-motion (500 frames per second) allowing us to slow an action down that actually took one second to fully twenty seconds on-screen. All of these taken together would provide an extraordinarily production palette. But it also meant that we had to travel with more than 40 cases of equipment — and do so in seven different countries. The logistics were severe.  Read further:

August 30, 2011 3:33 pm 0 comments